Tim Callahan

Defenders of the Faith

Jesus fulfilled more than 300 OT prophesies

September 15, 2012

Tags: 300 reasons to believe

According to Crosswalk.org, more than 300 Messianic prophecies made in the Old Testament were fulfilled in Jesus Christ’s life, death and resurrection. The chances of one person fulfilling a mere eight of those prophecies are 1 in 100,000,000,000,000,000. For one person to fulfill 48 of these prophecies, the number becomes staggering: 1 chance in 10-to-the-157th power. Add to that the other 250 prophecies, and it becomes impossible for any other person except Jesus to ever fit that particular sequence of time and events.
That He lived and died on a tree has even been recorded by Jewish and Greek historians, who were not Christian. According to Jesus.org, many of these prophecies would have been impossible for Jesus to deliberately conspire to fulfill, such as: His descent from Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob (Genesis 12:3, 17:19); His birth in Bethlehem (Micah 5:2); His crucifixion with criminals (Isaiah 53:12); the piercing of His hands and feet on the cross (Psalm 22:16); the soldiers gambling for His clothes (Psalm 22:18); the piercing of His side and that His bones were not broken at His death (Zechariah 12:10; Psalm 34:20); and His burial among the rich (Isaiah 53:9). Jesus also predicted His own death and resurrection (John 2:19-22). Allabouttruth.org, lists other OT prophesies that Jesus fulfilled: born of a virgin (Isaiah 7:14; Matthew 1:21-23); born of the tribe of Judah (Genesis 49:10; Luke 3:23, 33; Hebrews 7:14); born of the house of David (2 Samuel 7:12-16; Matthew 1:1); taken to Egypt (Hosea 11:1; Matthew 2:14-15); Herod´s killing of the infants (Jeremiah 31:15; Matthew 2:16-18); anointed by the Holy Spirit (Isaiah 11:2; Matthew 3:16-17); heralded by a messenger - John the Baptist - (Isaiah 40:3-5; Malachi 3:1; Matthew 3:1-3); would perform miracles (Isaiah 35:5-6; Matthew 9:35); would preach good news (Isaiah 61:1; Luke 4:14-21); would minister in Galilee (Isaiah 9:1; Matthew 4:12- 16); would cleanse the Temple (Malachi 3:1; Matthew 21:12-13); would first present Himself as King 173,880 days from the decree to rebuild Jerusalem (Daniel 9:25; Matthew 21:4-11); would enter Jerusalem as a king on a donkey (Zechariah 9:9; Matthew 21:4-9); would be rejected by Jews (Psalm 118:22; 1 Peter 2:7); would die a humiliating death (Psalm 22; Isaiah 53); and would rise from the dead (Psalm 17:15, Isaiah 26:19, Daniel 12:2, Psalm 16:10, Job 19:26, Psalm 49: 6-15; John 2:19-26).
We have at least 300 reasons to believe. Check them out on your own. You will be amazed.
Copyright © 2012 by Tim Callahan

Christians believe in a myth, madman or Messiah?

September 14, 2012

Tags: Madman or Messiah?

By Tim Callahan
Here are some things to consider to help you decide if Jesus Christ was the main character in a story designed to fool the masses into joining a religious cult, or truly the Son of God:
A Jewish carpenter from a cult has a special day for him 20 centuries after He died?
Why did Jesus not save himself from torture and execution and back down from his claims as the Son of God and that He needed die to repair man’s broken relationship with God? Why would He die horribly for a lie?
Why would 12 men, His disciples, allow themselves to be tortured and die for a con?
How did 12 uneducated and stubborn men run with a made up story and turn a Roman world upside down in a matter of a few years?
Why have more than 5,000 full or partial copies of Scripture been found spanning 2,000 years and yet they still tell the same stories. Why not embellish? Take out or put in? Why not spice it up? Why not downplay the bad parts?
If you were writing a book to con the masses would you include Jesus’s agony in the garden? Peter’s denial? Thomas’s doubt? Judas’s betrayal? The disciples’ fear, hiding in closed rooms after Christ’s death? The disciples thick-headedness that caused them to only really believe after they saw the resurrected Christ. (He had been telling and showing them who He was for the previous three years).
Why would Paul run with a lie and subject himself to being beaten, whipped, stoned and left for dead, chased through towns, jailed several times, tortured and killed?
Why does anybody need a Savior? People are basically good with a few bad apples thrown in, right? (Well, have you’ve kept all the ten commandments? I haven’t.)
Why does anyone have to follow commandments? Think of your town, your state, your country, your world without laws. Maybe they are for our own protection and good, not to spoil the fun.
Was the world created out of nothing? A creation without a creator? If we are all here because gases exploded in a big bang, where did the gases come from? Who made the gases?
If man is ever evolving, getting bigger and stronger and smarter, why haven’t we seen drastic physical changes in man over the last several thousand years. And why have there been more deaths in wars in the last century than in all of history combined? Is that evolving?
Finally, why is Christianity the one religion where God came down to man, and man doesn’t have to work his way to God and paradise and heaven?
Jesus did the work for us on the cross. Remember the story of the thief on the cross recorded in Luke 23:39-41? Jesus told him “Today you will be in paradise” because the dying man believed Jesus was who He said He was. The thief had nothing to commend himself to God but Jesus.
Didn’t Jesus simply say, as recorded in John 3:16: “He who believes in me shall not perish but have everlasting life”?
What if the story is true? What if Jesus was who He said He was? What if he was fully man and fully God, died for our sins, and rose from the dead?
I’ve left you something to think about.
Copyright © 2012 by Tim Callahan

Jesus is the way, the truth and the life

September 14, 2012

Tags: Jesus is the way?

By Tim Callahan
“Jesus is the way, the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me” (John 14:6).
I had never met an Archbishop, much less heard him speak. At Grace Church Waccamaw (Pawleys Island, S.C.) in February, I had the privilege of both.
I attended Denver Seminary and graduated from Regent University so I was eagerly awaiting the deep theological depths only an archbishop could mine (i.e., dig deep).
“Jesus is the message,” Archbishop Emmanuel Kolini said.
Yeah, I thought, He is. Man, I can’t want until he blasts past this and gets to some spiritual meat.
“Jesus is the way, the truth and the life.”
Amen. Brother, preach it.
And, He did. A simpler message than Billy Graham used to preach.
What? Spiritual milk? Then it hit me. You know what? We really don’t preach this message often enough in America for fear of being called intolerant, judgmental or narrow minded.
Archbishop Kolini wasn’t afraid.
“Jesus is the way, the only way to heaven,” he said. “Jesus said, ‘No one comes to the Father except through me.’”
The “way” is a direction, the Archbishop said. Jesus is the way.
The “truth” is Jesus is the only way to heaven, he said, and Jesus changing hearts is the only way to really change things for good here on Earth - like preventing the genocide that went on in Rwanda in the 1990s. Changes in government or regimes do not change man’s sin nature, Kolini said.
The “life” is eternal, for those who repent and believe in Jesus Christ as God and man, dying for their sins and rising from the dead, awaiting His return to judge the living and the dead. The ultimate judgment is where we will spend eternity and, according to Ephesians 2:8, it is based on faith not works: “God saved you by his special favor when you believed. And you can’t take credit from this; it is a gift from God.”
That was essentially the Archbishop’s message. The same gospel Paul preached. The same gospel Christians should be preaching but often don’t because they fear rejection.
The “way” is the stumbling block that gets non-Christians in an uproar. The argument might go like this: “Who are you, Mr. Archbishop, to tell me there is only one way to heaven? Who made you God? How do you know it all? And, what makes you think you can judge me?”
The Archbishop didn’t say it, Jesus Christ did.
Jesus is thought of by some as a good moral teacher. But, what moral teacher in his right mind would say he is the way to heaven?
Readers of the Bible can’t separate all the good moral guidelines from the fact Jesus said other things, things that only a lunatic - or God - would say. Things like, “I am the way, the truth and the life, and no one comes to the Father except through me.” Or, the John 3:16 quote we are all so familiar with: “For God so loved the world that He gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in Him will not perish but have everlasting life.”
This is either straight talk from God, or rambling from a guy who needs a straight jacket. There are no other options.
So, if God said it, then is the Archbishop helping you or hurting you by passing that information along? Wouldn’t you want someone to tell you about Jesus, if your eternal destiny depended on it? What shows real love, agreeing with you on religion so you will like me, or disagreeing and sharing that the God of the universe can save you from hell and give you an abundant life.
No one says, even God doesn’t say, that you have to believe it. God gives everyone a choice; it’s called free will.
I have a suggestion. Read the gospel of John (at least read Chapters 1-3), ask God to reveal if what you are reading is true, and talk to a minister or a Christian friend.
It may be the best thing you have ever done in your life, and pave the way to the truth and the life.
(Scripture quotations are taken from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright ©1996. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Wheaton, Illinois 60189. All rights reserved.)
Copyright © 2012 by Tim Callahan












Welcome

September 14, 2012

Tags: Welcome

I don't know about you, but I rarely shared my faith with others. I would often pass up opportunities that God provided to talk to a friend, co-worker or neighbor about Jesus. Then I would walk away feeling guilty and ashamed.
I believed. I was excited about what Jesus had done in my life. But, something held me back.
I realized after many years that I was afraid because I wasn’t prepared. I had no confidence, confidence that comes from being – as the Bible says – ready in-season and out-of-season to give the reasons for my belief. (2 Tim. 4:1-5)
I don’t mean giving my testimony. Most non-Christians aren’t going to sit and listen to a testimony. They are, however, going to argue, debate, and ask questions. Questions I previously wasn’t prepared to answer.
However, after researching and writing a non-fiction book for people in 12 Step programs on how to know if Jesus is the Higher Power, and a fiction book filled with apologetics that is intended to inform and entertain, I am a little more prepared. And, I want to keep on learning so I can be ready in-season and out.
That is the purpose of this blog. For you and me to share the reasons we believe, and share our experiences in witnessing and evangelizing. Our successes; our failures.
To prepare. To be ready to give a defense. To help each other and our friends fulfill the Great Commission. (See Matt. 28:16-20.)
I often think that I will have 80 years to get up the nerve to talk to someone. But, I may not have tomorrow. You, or your friend, or your neighbor, might not have tomorrow. This was brought home this summer as a friend of ours died at the scene of a horrible car wreck.
We just saw her. She was in great health. She was happy. Then, she was dead.
It is time to prepare. Will you join me? Will you help me?

Selected Works

Non-fiction
Answers to questions 12-Steppers and non-Christians have about the divinity of Jesus.
Fiction
What if the cameras were turned around on the media? The first lady leaves a note for the president blaming the media for her suicide. Her last wish is he use the media's own tactics against them and expose the hypocrites in the press.
Nonfiction
Real people, real stories from South Carolina that will encourage, inform and inspire anyone, anywhere.
The only book that provides detailed information on athletic and academic programs at American colleges.